The Soldier and the Girl

Apropos our upcoming class discussion Performance as Intervention, please see this article which reports on the context of this provocative picture, allegedly depicting an IDF solider stepping on a Palestinian girl.

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Categories: In the News

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3 Comments on “The Soldier and the Girl”

  1. February 6, 2012 at 10:28 pm #

    The viral misrepresentation of that image reminds me of another one which made the rounds several months ago, of a woman opening a burqa to expose herself to the camera/crowd. This image was described as a muslim woman protesting use of the garment, but it’s actually from a parade in Cabezo de Torres, Spain – the images are also a part of this photoset:
    http://www.laverdad.es/murcia/multimedia/fotos/region-murcia/51258-grande-carnaval-cabezo-torres-0.html

  2. February 7, 2012 at 12:44 am #

    Thanks for sharing this. During an undergrad philosophy of literature course, I read Roland Barthes’s book of essays Mythologies. This was one of first times I encountered detailed analyses of images and their signification strategies. You might enjoy the Myth Today section available at the following http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mythologies_(book) especially if you’re still considering the violence of the image.

    • February 7, 2012 at 1:03 am #

      I passed up on Violence of the Image – but I’ve read Mythologies, it’s easily a favorite, and a big influence for me. Myth as a order of signification and that relationship between signs and ideology is actually at the heart of my interests. Those “semio-political interventions” like one writer calls it, are always useful and great for critical readings, but Barthes later turned away and wrote “It is not signs that must be cracked wide open – signifiers on one side, signified on the other – but the very idea of the sign.” Good stuff!

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