Can you HEAR color?

I came across this article while browsing the bbc website. Thought I’d share with you all since we were talking about sound this week

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-16681630

Perhaps, some inspiration as we are thinking about our audio pieces. Cheers!

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7 Comments on “Can you HEAR color?”

  1. Laila
    February 16, 2012 at 12:29 pm #

    This is great, I am also really interested in the ways people cope with various disabilities, and different types of blindess.

    Here is an article about Chuck Close where his facial blindness and various other leaning disabilities are discussed. I met Chuck Close randomly a couple months ago and he took great interest in my own learning disability (like him, I am severely dyslexic.) I’ve been to his studio three of four times since then and he’s shown me how he flattens images (by taking a photo) in order to retain the picture in his mind. He then goes on to painting the image to further embed them into his mind. More to come on this later!

    http://www.aan.com/elibrary/neurologynow/?event=home.showArticle&id=ovid.com:/bib/ovftdb/01222928-201107040-00010

  2. Laila
    February 16, 2012 at 12:39 pm #

    * Note to Unathi: I accidentally hit post on this comment before I was done. Please delete the other one. This is the version I wanted to post! Thanks!! *

    This is great, I am also really interested in the ways people cope with various disabilities, and different types of blindess.

    Here is an article about Chuck Close where his facial blindness and various other leaning disabilities are discussed. I met Chuck Close randomly a couple months ago and he took interest in my own learning disability (like him, I am severely dyslexic.) I’ve been to his studio three of four times since then and he’s shown me how he flattens images (by taking a photo) in order to retain the picture in his mind. He then goes on to painting the image to further embed them into his mind. More to come on this later!

    http://www.aan.com/elibrary/neurologynow/?event=home.showArticle&id=ovid.com:/bib/ovftdb/01222928-201107040-00010

    Your comment is awaiting moderation.

  3. February 16, 2012 at 2:44 pm #

    Thanks for sharing this, Unathi. I’m excited to share this with Peter Asaro’s course Robots as Media during the week on Robotic Vision. It’s amazing what the cybernetics student Adam Montandon was able to make with low-cost equipment.

  4. unathimahlati
    February 16, 2012 at 3:05 pm #

    What an empowering article! Thanks for sharing!

    “Teachers were not accepting of these differences, Close recalls. “There wasn’t any such thing as a learning disability in the 1940s or ’50s—not where I grew up,” he says. “Kids like me were just considered dumb or lazy.”

    One thing that technology has permitted is the various platforms for learning; blogging, video games, film, etc. One does not need to write an academic book to communicate his/her ideas; today, we have the freedom to employ multimodal forms of expression. Now, do you feel these platforms make it easier for you to cope with being dyslexic?

  5. Laila
    February 17, 2012 at 9:12 pm #

    It’s really interesting that you bring up this point. Yes, I definitely believe that the ability to express myself through various multimodal platforms and mediums has allowed me to not only convey my thoughts in a clearer manner, but also aids in comprehending new materia.

    Dyslexia affects ones ability to read (and therefore write) and has three main subgroups: auditory, visual, and attentional.
    The first deals with the inability to connect sounds to symbols (or letters). The second involves problems with visual processing, specifically recognizing and remembering the way words look, while those who have attentional dyslexia experience letter/or word migration. A phrase like “cat in a hat” would be perceived as “hat in a cat.”. I have attentional dyslexia, which makes comprehending written text much more timely when compared to those with out dyslexia. If I were to quickly scan over a sentence without focusing on what’s written, some words can appear jumbled and therefore meaningless. The same applies for writing; quickly jotting down a phrase can end up in misspellings or words that are out of order. This makes expressing myself in writing and retaining written information more difficult than expression through other visual mediums, such as film. Various studies have suggested that dyslexics have strong visual and practical/manipulative skills in addition to a more acute grasp of two-dimensional and three-dimensional form. Chuck Close is only one of many artist with dyslexia, other include da Vinci, Picasso, Rodin and Pollock.

    I find that after watching films, I usually retain a lot more of the information than if I were to read the script. I also noticed that taking notes as I read helps. This process usually takes much more time for me. Many times I end up with notes that make no sense to any one else due to misspellings and word migration, but they really helps with comprehension. Being able to take advantage of different technological platforms as means of expression certainly makes it easier for me to relay my thoughts..

  6. February 19, 2012 at 12:34 pm #

    Dyslexia advocates are pushing educational institutions to view it as a “learning difference,” rather than a disability. A while back I was a production assistent for Dislecksia: The Movie, and I got to see a lot of work has been done with exploring multi-sensory learning techniques that don’t depend so heavily on visual material. It turns out a lot of actors and high profile successful people are dyslexics who did very poorly in school, and some of the researchers interviewed for the film speculated that their interpersonal and social skills are a means of compensation for the disadvantages of dyslexia in a school system that caters to text-oriented learning.

    http://dyslexiathemovie.com/films/dislecksia.html

  7. miranda shafer
    February 21, 2012 at 1:57 am #

    This is really interesting. I wasn’t diagnosed with ADD until I was in my early 20’s and am very interested in how people learn and how they cope with learning disabilities.

    There is a great radio lab episode that discussed some of these issues, as an added bonus it has Oliver Sacks AND Chuck Klose.
    http://www.radiolab.org/blogs/radiolab-blog/2010/jun/15/strangers-in-the-mirror/

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