Theater of the Oppressed Workshop (2/25-26)

Below is the email I received regarding the upcoming Theater of the Oppressed Workshop, it is a 2 day event that costs $95. If we get a group of people together perhaps we could receive a discounted rate. There are also other events happening (see the bottom of the email.) To subscribe to the mailing list click here.

The Theater of the Oppressed Laboratory (TOPLAB)

–founded in 1990–
451 West Street
New York, New York 10014
(212) 924-1858
toplab@toplab.org
toplabnyc@gmail.com
http://www.toplab.org

The Theater of the Oppressed Laboratory (TOPLAB)

“We must emphasize: What Brecht does not want is that the spectators
continue to leave their brains with their hats upon entering the
theater, as do bourgeois spectators.”–Augusto Boal

“The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways.
The point is to change it.” –Karl Marx

The Theater of the Oppressed Laboratory (TOPLAB)

presents

Image Theater

a two-day workshop

Saturday, February 25, 2012, 10:00 am to 6:00 pm; and
Sunday, February 26, 10:00 am to 6:00 pm

at  the Brecht Forum
451 West Street (West Side Highway, at Bank Street, one block north of
West Eleventh Street)
New York City

facilitated by Kayhan Irani and Marie-Claire Picher

Image Theater, part of the repertory of Theater of the Oppressed, was
created by the late Brazilian director and cultural activist Augusto
Boal (1931-2009).

Drawing on the theories of popular education developed by his friend
and colleague, Paulo Freire, Boal appropriated theater games and
exercises for use as organizing tools by communities in struggle.
These tools are designed to develop individual skills of observation
and self-reflection, and cooperative group interactions. Image Theater
is the ideal starting point for training in Theater of the Oppressed
techniques. In Image Theater, leadership- and consensus-building games
and techniques are used to explore relations of power and group
solutions to concrete problems of oppression through “living body
imagery”. Discussions begin to take place through the language of
images, offering a fresh approach to power analysis and new
opportunities for the exchange of ideas.

This workshop is open to all and no prior theater experience is
necessary to participate. Pre-registration is strongly encouraged.
Please write to toplab@toplab.org to let us know that you will be
attending.

Kayhan Irani, who recently returned from Afghanistan, is an artivist
and and a writer, director, performer and facilitator. In 2010 she won
a New York Emmy award for best writing for We Are New York a 9-episode
broadcast TV drama and English language learning and civic engagement
tool for immigrant New Yorkers. Her acclaimed one-woman show, We’ve
Come Undone, which tells the stories of immigrant women post 9/11, has
toured nationally and internationally. She is a TOPLAB facilitator and
leads workshops for diverse organizations and institutions on a local,
national, and international level—traveling as far as Kabul,
Afghanistan (2010 and 2011) and Baghdad, Iraq (2004) to use theater
for change. She has lead theater programs for community groups, public
schools, juvenile detention facilities, government agencies, and with
the general public. Kayhan has co-edited a volume of essays entitled
Telling Stories to Change the World: Global Voices on the Power of
Stories to Build Community and Make Social Justice Claims (Routledge,
May 2008), about projects around the world that use storytelling as a
way of creating social justice. Kayhan is a member of the Dramatists’
Guild.

Marie-Claire Picher is a co-founder (1990) of the Theater of the
Oppressed Laboratory (TOPLAB) and has worked and collaborated closely
with Augusto Boal until his death in 2009. One of the most experienced
Theater of the Oppressed practitioners in North America, she has
presented thousands of hours of TO facilitation training in New York
and throughout the United States, as well as in Chiapas, Tabasco,
Mexico City, Guatemala and Cuba.

Tuition–sliding scale: $95-$150
(Active-duty military, recent veterans: $1.00)

Register online:
http://brechtforum.org/civicrm/event/info?id=12135&reset=1

***

Other Upcoming TOPLAB Workshops and Events

Unless noted, all events take place at:

The Brecht Forum
451 West Street (West Side Highway, at Bank Street, one block north of
West Eleventh Street)
New York City

weekend of March 16-18 (date/time TBA)

TOPLAB at the Left Forum

Theater of the Oppressed for Self-Organizing and Building Community: A
Panel Discussion and Workshop

with Reg Flowers, Janet Gerson, Elia Gurna, Kayhan Irani, Marie-Claire
Picher and Reka Polonyi

at Pace University, near City Hall
New York City

more info at http://www.leftforum.org

***

Thursday, March 22

Un-Occupying the Spirit: A Report-Back on Theater and Solidarity in Afghanistan

a talk by Kayhan Irani

more info at http://brechtforum.org/civicrm/event/info?id=12137&reset=1

***

Saturday, March 24, 10:00 am to 6:00 pm, and
Sunday, March 25, 10:00 am to 6:00 pm

Newspaper Theater (two-day workshop)

facilitated by Kayhan Irani and Marie-Claire Picher

more info at http://brechtforum.org/civicrm/event/info?id=12136&reset=1

***

Saturday, April 21, 10:00 am to 6:00 pm

The Politics of the Theater of the Oppressed

facilitated by Kayhan Irani and Marie-Claire Picher

more info at http://brechtforum.org/civicrm/event/info?id=12138&reset=1

***

Saturday, April 28, 10:00 am to 6:00 pm, and
Sunday, April 29, 10:00 am to 6:00 pm

Cop-in-the-Head (two-day workshop)

facilitated by Kayhan Irani and Marie-Claire Picher

more info at http://brechtforum.org/civicrm/event/info?id=12142&reset=1

***

Saturday, May 26, 10:00 am to 6:00 pm,
Sunday, May 27, 10:00 am to 6:00 pm, and
Monday, May 28, 10:00 am to 6:00 pm

Invisible Theater (three-day workshop)

facilitated by Kayhan Irani and Marie-Claire Picher

more info at http://brechtforum.org/civicrm/event/info?id=12143&reset=1

***

Friday, June 22, 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm,
Saturday, June 23, 10:00 am to 6:00 pm, and
Sunday, June 24, 10:00 am to 6:00 pm

Forum Theater (three-day workshop)

facilitated by Kayhan Irani and Marie-Claire Picher

more info at http://brechtforum.org/civicrm/event/info?id=12144&reset=1

***

“The Marxist poetics of Bertolt Brecht does not stand opposed to one
or another formal aspect of the Hegelian idealist poetics but rather
denies its very essence, asserting that the character is not absolute
subject but the object of economic or social forces to which he
responds and in virtue of which he acts…

“In Brecht’s objection [to idealist poetics], as well as in any other
Marxist objection, what is at stake is who, or which term, precedes
the other: the subjective or the objective. For idealist poetics,
social thought conditions social being; for Marxist poetics, social
being conditions social thought. In Hegel’s view, the spirit creates
the dramatic action; for Brecht, the character’s social relations
create the dramatic action….

“Brecht was a Marxist; therefore, for him, a theatrical work cannot
end in repose, in equilibrium. It must, on the contrary, show the ways
in which society loses its equilibrium, which way society is moving,
and how to hasten that transition.

“Brecht contends that the popular artist must abandon the downtown
stages and go to the neighborhoods, because only there will he find
people who are truly interested in changing society: in the
neighborhoods he should show his images of social life to the workers
who are interested in changing that social life, since they are its
victims. A theater that attempts to change the changers of society
cannot lead to repose, cannot re-establish equilibrium. The bourgeois
police tries to re-establish equilibrium, to enforce repose: a Marxist
artist, on the other hand, must promote the movement toward national
liberation and toward the liberation of classes oppressed by
capital…[Hegel and Aristotle] desire a quiet somnolence at the end
of the spectacle; Brecht wants the theatrical spectacle to be the
beginning of action: the equilibrium should be sought by transforming
society, and not by purging the individual of his just demands and
needs….

“I believe that all the truly revolutionary theatrical groups should
transfer to the people the means of production in the theater so that
the people themselves may utilize them. The theater is a weapon, and
it is the people who should wield it.” –Augusto Boal, The Theater of
the Oppressed
_______________________________________________

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