Archive | March 6, 2012

Critical Mass and how bikes changed the way San Francisco thinks of roads

SF is in the process of redefining the success of its road system. Five years ago, the city decided that Auto Level of Service, the means used to define how well streets are being used based on the number of cars the roads can support on a daily basis, was not a reasonable metric of […]

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three ideas: noise mapping / conflict awareness / cross nearest boundary

Three ideas (rather quickly and messily described below): 1) I’m still interested in noise. Official noise complaints mark the contested spaces within the city. I did this map of sound complaints for the Noise Radio project. It shows all the locations of noise complaints throughout the city. Drawn in Processing, this map takes the City’s […]

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Preliminary project ideas

I’ve designed this semester to benefit from the interactions between my various courses: Bonnie McEwan’s Media Advocacy in the Global Public Sphere, Nitin’s course and the Hong Kong IFP. My IFP interests concern the situation of the migrant laborers in Hong Kong, specifically those from South Asia, and their economic practices. At this time, I’m […]

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what does a map say?

Denis Wood’s Rethinking the Power of Maps got me thinking about what a map could say that wasn’t directly plotted along an x or y axis. The idea that a map could be transformed into a protest map simply by renaming was especially powerful. By undertaking such a simple act, however, it is possible to […]

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Jeremiah’s Proposal: Audience Participation

I am pulled in two directions: mapping and an arduino/processing interactive piece. Here’s a vague idea for the latter: Audience Participation Building on the ideas of and combining “My Little Piece of Privacy” (the processing curtain piece) and “Chatters and Listening” (Australian Magpie Network), I imagine an interactive piece that uses interactivity with a human […]

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How powerful are protest maps?

I think that the most interesting question posed by the readings this week (primarily Denis Woods) is the question how can a protest map be revolutionary and effective, because maps typically rely on data to make their point and the people who create protest maps use the same data that the government uses, or they […]

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NYPL Lab: Map Warper

The NYPL Lab is “an experimental unit at the Library developing ideas and tools for digital research. A collaboration among curators, designers and technologists, NYPL Labs is dedicated to rethinking what a public research library can be and do in the new information commons. We develop everything from proof-of-concept pilots to fully realized web applications and digital archives, as […]

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The Beauty of Data Visualization

“Abstraction today is no longer that of the map, the double, the mirror or the concept. Simulation is no longer that of a territory, a referential being or substance. It is the generation of models of a real without origin or reality: a hyperreal. The territory no longer precedes the map, nor survives it. Henceforth, […]

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